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Walpole Future of British Luxury Summit 2021
A New Era for Luxury
Monday 6th September
At the Londoner
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Renaissance-Ready Leadership with Philosophy at Work

'Post Pandemic' 2021 will undoubtedly be a time of transition as the luxury sector takes full advantage of the incredible digital gains of the past year, and truly capitalises on the opportunities for the 'great reset' that lie ahead. Many commentators predict that we will see a revival of 'the roaring 20s': a decade of growth, transformation and fresh opportunity - a renaissance of not just arts and culture, but for businesses and their people.
21st Mar 2021
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Walpole insights Renaissance-Ready Leadership with Philosophy at Work

But how do you prepare for this upcoming 'renaissance'? What skills do leaders need? What will the future of work look like? And how do you empower your teams to create a mindset and culture to embrace this new world of opportunity?

On Friday 19th March, Walpole hosted Dr. Brennan Jacoby, the philosopher and founder of Philosophy at Work, and Ian Hardie, VP Learning & Development at Sephora, for a members-only skills seminar, exploring practical and positive best practice. They shared insights gleaned from the last 12-months, and shed light on what businesses can do to help position their people and culture to be ready for what comes next.

The second half of 2021 will undoubtedly be a time of transition as the luxury sector takes full advantage of the incredible digital gains of the past year, and looks to the opportunities for growth and transformation that lie ahead. What skills, then, will be needed to flourish in this potential ‘renaissance period’ and how can we empower our teams practically and psychologically for a new BAU?

Uncertainty and unusual circumstances have forced us all to operate in an adaptive, stress-response pattern over the past year, and over- and under-reactions will need to give way to an equilibrium for the new world awaiting us. Middle ways to embrace include increased flexibility and choice in tech use, greater clarity around what’s expected of us and a more comfortable balance between hyper-professionalisation and social overcompensation.

The zeitgeist question, of course, is around working from home, post-pandemic, something framed as a progressive opportunity. Dissolving the rigid 9-5 is arguably a good thing, but we also need to appreciate the value of a physical office for many, particularly younger colleagues, and perhaps learn to use it strategically instead of consigning it to history.

Appreciating that supporting resilience will be as important in the transition as in the crisis is crucial. And we will also need to work out what to hold on to and what to let go from the past 12 months as we move forward; clarifying business values can help us make those decisions, both on a business - and a human level. Ultimately, the key to a successful transition lies here.

As the world opens up again, not everyone will be at the same point: some will be excited, some nervous, some worn down. As such, showing people they are valued will be more effective in driving business forward than just trying to get things ‘right’ after a year when right has been very much a question mark.

Please click here to watch On Demand.
philosophyatwork.co.uk